50k ‘Gen Z’ Students Identify as Republican

Alberto Avalos

Innovation and Technology Program Manager

For Immediate Release

 Contact: Gabi Huesca
ghuesca@rabengroup.com
909.306.4050
Danielle Gibson
danielleg@mycollegeoptions.org
913.424.4868

       

LOOKING TO 2020 ELECTIONS, NEW SURVEY OF 50,000 ‘generation z’ HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS INDICATES MOST IDENTIFY AS REPUBLICANS AND THAT THE TRUMP EFFECT CAN HAVE IMPACT going forward in contrast to millenials 

My College Options® and Hispanic Heritage Foundation Present Findings from National Survey of 50K High School Students – Including 1st Time Voters – Broken Down by Ethnicity, Gender, Race, Priorities

WASHINGTON, D.C. – My College Options and the Hispanic Heritage Foundation (HHF) today presented the results of a new national survey of approximately 50,000 “Generation Z” high school students’ (ages 14-18) attitudes on the 2016 presidential election which found that the majority identify as Republicans – in sharp contrast to Millennials – and overall would vote for Donald Trump.  Trump would win with first-time voters by a large margin, and with girls by a narrower margin.  More than one in three participants said they would “choose not to vote.”  Clinton would beat Trump among African Americans and Latinos by a large margin, and by a narrower margin with Asians.  The Pulse Study on the Presidential Election also serves as a strong glimpse to the 2020 presidential elections when all participants will able to vote. In addition to asking for which candidate students would vote, the study also explores students’ perceptions regarding the issues most important to them, the direction of the country, presidential performance, their level of political engagement, and what media sources they use to learn about political issues.

The findings were broken down by ethnicity, gender, and first time voter status to provide deeper insights. In terms of the top issues, African American and Latino students said education was their top priority followed by the economy, immigration and racism for Latinos and racism, economy and healthcare for African Americans. For Whites, it was the economy followed by education, gun rights and terrorism.   White students were least likely to say they would “choose not to vote” with African Americans, Asians and Latinos are most likely to not vote in the election.

See below for highlights of the Presidential Pulse Study and the full study at http://tabsoft.co/2dJC4km.

The presidential polling research, conducted by My College Options, began in late September 2016 and findings are still being up to the moment.   The study was constructed using the results of paper survey ballots administered in high schools nationally, resulting in a nationally representative study sample and a marginal error of .6%. “With unparalleled access to our nation’s youth, we at My College Options believe it is our obligation to amplify their voices on issues that are so critical to our future.  My College Options serves as a catalyst for lifelong learning and, through this national youth vote, we want to promote students’ passions for civic engagement,” said Ryan Munce, Vice President of My College Options.

“It’s critical to understand what the students’ priorities and preferences are as we found out in the Presidential Pulse Study to better engage this potentially powerful subset of the electorate at an early stage for the 2020 elections,” said Jose Antonio Tijerino, president and CEO of HHF.  “Our findings shocked us and clearly state that the Trump effect was not only felt by adults and can have an impact going forward with Generation Z.  It’s also an important message that youth can’t be taken for granted as to how they lean politically by either side of the aisle.  I’m grateful to our friends at My College Options and the Raben Group for giving youth a voice during these important elections and beyond.”

The top findings indicate:

First Time Voters:

  • 46% Trump / 31% Clinton / 11% 3rd party candidate / 4% write-in candidate / 6% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (44%), disapprove (30%), no opinion (20%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (11%), no (56%), I don’t know (27%)
  • 23% very engaged in politics / 50% somewhat engaged / 17% not very engaged / 5% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: economy (44%), education (39%), gun rights (28%), health care (18%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (66%), social media sites (47%), online news (47%), teachers (44%)

Overall:

  • 34% Trump / 20% Clinton / 9% 3rd party candidate / 4% write-in candidate / 31% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (41%), disapprove (25%), no opinion (28%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (7%), no (55%), I don’t know (34%)
  • 12% very engaged in politics / 42% somewhat engaged / 26% not very engaged / 13% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: education (41%), economy (38%), gun rights (27%), health care (19%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (61%), social media sites (46%), parents (45%), online news (41%)

Female:

  • 27% Trump / 24% Clinton / 9% 3rd party candidate / 4% write-in candidate / 35% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (46%), disapprove (20%), no opinion (30%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (5%), no (55%), I don’t know (36%)
  • 10% very engaged in politics / 44% somewhat engaged / 29% not very engaged / 13% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: education (50%), economy (33%), health care (24%), gun rights (22%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (64%), social media sites (52%), parents (51%), teachers (45%)

Male:

  • 42% Trump / 17% Clinton / 9% 3rd party candidate / 3% write-in candidate / 28% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (37%), disapprove (31%), no opinion (26%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (9%), no (54%), I don’t know (31%)
  • 15% very engaged in politics / 42% somewhat engaged / 24% not very engaged / 14% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: economy (43%), education (34%), gun rights (33%), terrorism (20%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (60%), social media sites (41%), online news (40%), parents (40%)

Hispanic:

  • 12% Trump / 31% Clinton / 11% 3rd party candidate / 4% write-in candidate / 40% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (64%), disapprove (9%), no opinion (26%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (8%), no (54%), I don’t know (38%)
  • 11% very engaged in politics / 42% somewhat engaged / 30% not very engaged / 16% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: education (49%), economy (42%), immigration (24%), racism/race relations (22%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (64%), social media sites (51%), online news (45%), teachers (44%)

African American:

  • 7% Trump / 47% Clinton / 7% 3rd party candidate / 4% write-in candidate / 33% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (76%), disapprove (5%), no opinion (18%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (8%), no (53%), I don’t know (38%)
  • 12% very engaged in politics / 41% somewhat engaged / 28% not very engaged / 18% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: education (54%), racism/race relations (33%), economy (33%), health care (24%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (66%), social media sites (47%), teachers (44%), parents (42%)

Asian:

  • 18% Trump / 26% Clinton / 11% 3rd party candidate / 5% write-in candidate / 38% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (56%), disapprove (16%), no opinion (27%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (11%), no (49%), I don’t know (38%)
  • 13% very engaged in politics / 46% somewhat engaged / 28% not very engaged / 12% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: economy (50%), education (42%), racism/race relations (21%), health care (19%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (61%), social media sites (56%), online news (52%), teachers (48%)

White:

  • 48% Trump / 11% Clinton / 9% 3rd party candidate / 4% write-in candidate / 27% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (31%), disapprove (37%), no opinion (32%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (6%), no (61%), I don’t know (32%)
  • 14% very engaged in politics / 48% somewhat engaged / 27% not very engaged / 11% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: economy (40%), education (37%), gun rights (32%), terrorism (22%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (68%), parents (54%), social media sites (52%), online news (46%)

Non-White:

  • 15% Trump / 34% Clinton / 9% 3rd party candidate / 4% write-in candidate / 36% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (63%), disapprove (12%), no opinion (24%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (8%), no (54%), I don’t know (37%)
  • 12% very engaged in politics / 43% somewhat engaged / 29% not very engaged / 16% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: education (50%), economy (38%), racism/race relations (24%), health care (21%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (64%), social media sites (49%), teachers (44%), online news (43%)

Non-White Male:

  • 22% Trump / 30% Clinton / 10% 3rd party candidate / 3% write-in candidate / 34% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (59%), disapprove (16%), no opinion (24%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (11%), no (52%), I don’t know (37%)
  • 13% very engaged in politics / 41% somewhat engaged / 28% not very engaged / 17% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: education (43%), economy (42%), gun rights (25%), racism/race relations (20%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (61%), social media sites (44%), online news (41%), teachers (39%)

White Male:

  • 58% Trump / 8% Clinton / 9% 3rd party candidate / 3% write-in candidate / 21% “I would choose not to vote in this election”
  • Obama job approval: approve (27%), disapprove (45%), no opinion (28%)
  • Direction of country – positive: yes (9%), no (63%), I don’t know (28%)
  • 18% very engaged in politics / 48% somewhat engaged / 23% not very engaged / 10% not at all engaged
  • Top issues: economy (46%), gun rights (39%), education (28%), terrorism (24%)
  • Top news sources: Cable news (68%), parents (48%), social media sites (46%), online news (45%)

Methodology

This study represents the third phase of the Pulse Study, a multi-phase, omnibus style survey of U.S. high school students conceived, designed and conducted by the Hispanic Heritage Foundation and My College Options. The study is being conducted in 6 unique phases using various methodologies.  Research topics and objectives for each phase are identified and refined through a collaborative effort of partnering organizations.  Each phase will have a customized survey instrument and a distinctive group of partners that brings relevant expertise and connection to the topics within that phase.  The included findings all stem from the third phase of the study.

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My College Options: My College Options® is the nation’s largest college planning program, offering free assistance and valuable resources to students, parents, high schools, counselors, and teachers nationwide. The program serves as the primary link between high school students and colleges, universities, and the tools they need to succeed.  For more information, visit www.mycollegeoptions.org.

Hispanic Heritage Foundation: The Hispanic Heritage Foundation inspires, prepares, and connects Latino leaders in the classroom, community and workforce to meet America’s priorities. HHF also promotes cultural pride, accomplishment and advocacy, as well as the great promise of the community through public awareness campaigns seen by millions.  HHF is headquartered in Washington, DC, and Los Angeles with satellite offices in NY, Miami, Silicon Valley and Mexico City. Visit www.HispanicHeritage.org for more information.